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What is Disney Magic

 
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Joined: 28 Jul 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 3:36 am    Post subject: What is Disney Magic Reply with quote

This has been on my mind alot lately.

I will have to say I have experienced magic in theme parks, wonderment, return to inosecence. This sort of thing, but I wonder what it realy is and how a person can bottle it, or say here it is. Disney has been making alot of claims of having it, but do they know what it is. I thoght well, it varys from person to person, but maybe not.

The topic is:

Where and when have you experienced magic.

Holly3216
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Posts: 15
(9/27/05 11:44 am)
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New Post Re: What is Disney Magic
For me, a good theater performance, or participating in dramatic improv is "magical". It's interesting characters and vibrant stories that draw me in, more than technology, or saccharine design... Maybe this is because I work with technology, and am a somewhat serious person...? Anyhow, I'd be interested in hearing what is magic for everyone else...

TheWithin
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Posts: 7
(9/27/05 3:45 pm)
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New Post Re: What is Disney Magic I think this is a great observation, Disney has been an inovater in animitronics, but animitronics just replace actors, and not usualy as well. There are times and place where actors would not work, as in a ride or a complicated costume.

Actors are the most efective way to get the story across and can actualy engage the audience. I will have to say that I have felt magic when viewing a play.

rforkel
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Posts: 16
(9/29/05 2:16 pm)
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New Post Magic defined (as I see it anyway) I believe the "magic" can be found in the details. Things that you and I take for granted. Disney has prided themselves in taking notice of the small things (at least in the past) and making sure that the little things matter even if only one in a million ever sees them. I'll give you an example:

I visited a Six Flags amusement park a couple of years ago. When taking a break for food I walked up to one of the restaurant windows and to my astonishment I had to literally kick all the garbage out from in front of the counter to order. I was disgusted that such a place could let this go like it had. Elsewhere in the park in the Midway games area I found employees literally leaning on counters almost asleep at thier post. That was the fastest way to kill the magic for me.

Magic happens when a "cast member" notices that a little girl has lost her mouse hat with her name on it. The cast member promptly "finds" it and gives the girl "her" hat (all the while knowing that he has just given her a new one with her name on it)

Magic happens when a "cast member" makes a connection with a family on vacation and through conversation finds out they are from the same hometown. Magic happens when a child meets thier favorite character for the first time and has a positive experience and memory.

Magic is people driven, not technology driven. While magical things can happen through technology, without the people it is just a show and nothing more. Magic is not just what you see but what you take home. Anyway, that's my take. Magic is all in the details.

Bruce Kring
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Posts: 1
(9/30/05 8:38 am)
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New Post Thats all What more can be said than that. To me you hit the nail on the head. It is the small things that create the magic and it always has been.

Bruce

TheWithin
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Posts: 8
(9/30/05 11:40 am)
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New Post details The most amazing thing is that the little details, interactions, cleanliness, service. These things don't cost alot to the company. Labor is exspensive but not nearly as exspensive as a new ride to draw the crowds. If the people have a good experience with the people, you don't realy need a lot of flash to get them to come back.

Holly3216
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Posts: 17
(10/3/05 9:41 am)
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New Post Re: details I just went to the Food and Wine Festival this weekend... and Mickey's Not-So-Scary Holloween Party is right now also... I think that's another neat thing about Disney: they have a lot of shows and seasonal events that add repeat value to the experience. Everytime I'm over there, I run into a different group of street performers. These details add to the experience.

(I would bet, too, that dressing a park for the holidays is a cheaper investment than a new ride: you can reuse the props year after year... and they probably require less re-furb because they aren't being used year-round...but dressing the park adds a lot to the experience for repeat guests... I look forward to the Christmas decorations this year...!).

rforkel
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Posts: 17
(10/5/05 6:48 pm)
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New Post I remember... I'm glad you brought that up. I remember attending the Millenium Celebration at Epcot and thought that it was an incredible idea, although I do wish they would have left some of the exhibits up year round. By far my favorite of all the Disney celebrations. Anyway...

Halloween, honestly, I could care less about and I would not go to any park for a Halloween celebration, be it Disney, Universal, Busch Gardens, whatever. The whole Haunted "whatever" idea is just played out to me (keep in mind, I understand that there are people who do like them). I don't think they are geared for kids and the Universal billboards and TV commercials scare my little kids nearly to death every year. They hate it, so why would I torment my family with that?

I like Universal's Mardi Gras festival and of course Christmas is always a spectacle in any theme park. I think Disney has special events down to a science. It seems like every other year is a "celebration"--Disney World's 25th Anniversary and the pink castle birthday cake (which I also hated), the Millenium Celebration at Epcot, Walt's 100th birthday, Disneyland's 50th Anniversary, I mean, what's next? Although it is a great way to keep things fresh.

I'm sure that Disneyland and California Adventure and the other Disney parks around the world have celebrations like the ones here in Florida but I never hear about them. Are they any good? Are they worth seeing? Are they knock-offs from other parks?

TheWithin
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Posts: 9
(10/7/05 11:31 am)
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New Post Magic I just can't accept that the magic is just details. Magic has to be an overwhelming experience. You have to give people something that is unexpected and diffrent from their every day lives. I think details complete the effect, but details are not the afect. I think decorations may add to the park, but I don't think that it makes a magical experience, or at least nothing I have seen. I want to shake people out of their every day lives. Any mall has decorations up for the seasons.

What is the WOW factor. People have become so hard, not musch realy impresses anymore.

I want to know where is the WOW.

rforkel
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Posts: 20
(10/7/05 3:29 pm)
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New Post Re: Magic The "WOW" is different for different people. For a family from another country, most things in the US provide a WOW factor. For those of us who are more "spoiled" by technology or things we take for granted, it takes more to WOW us.

Decades ago Disney broke the mold by opening Disneyland which at the time was so out of the ordinary people said it wouldn't work. Now the concepts and ideas Walt Disney developed are commonplace in most theme parks.

If magic was something to be bottled they would have sold it already. If your looking for a secret formula, it doesn't exist, outside of knowing your audience and finding what works. It's not as easy as it sounds. And whatever you do, do it with excellence, the very best that you can.

SenoritaVelasco
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Posts: 37
(10/7/05 3:42 pm)
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New Post Re: Magic This is such a difficult question. I personally have experienced something magical at Disneyland everytime I go and it's always different.

There was one time when Mickey called me over to him and gave me a big hug and one time when the white rabbit pulled me up to dance with him during the main street electrical parade and I felt like the only girl in the park!

There was the time when my very serious, big armed, marine grandfather got soaked on splash mountain and his hair was dripping and my mom and I couldn't stop laughing.

There was the time that I went with all my friends from highschool and we ran around holding hands in a big line completey oblivious to people staring at us

Oh and when I rode Indiana Jones for the first time *sigh*

Recently when I saw the 50 anniversary fireworks spectacular with the projections on the matterhorn AWESOME!

So, to paraphrase, it's different for everyone. Like everyone already said. Sorry I got sucked down memory lane.

rforkel
Member
Posts: 22
(10/8/05 9:43 pm)
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New Post More Magic
I think Disney magic also occurs when you share something with someone else. For another example: I remember going to Disney and seeing the Main Street Electrical Parade. I thought it was so cool when I was a kid and it created a memory that I'll never forget. My oldest daughter was fortunate enough to catch one of the performances a few years ago when they brough it back for a short time to Disney World. It was a shared experience and to me "magical"

People can go to any theme park for rides. They all have them and most of them are pretty good (when they are running). So, it's not about the rides. What about shows? I'll admit, I've been to a few shows that I wish I would not have wasted my time sitting there for 30 minutes. So, it's not about the shows, although Disney does a great job in the show department (I've never seen a Disney show that I didn't like--ever)

Maybe it's the expectation that you are visiting the "happiest place on earth". Maybe it's knowing that for a day or a week you can forget about reality and focus on pure fun, time with family, relaxation, without a care in the world. I believe that magic is more than an explanation or definition. It's an experience. And when you experience that magic you'll know it when you see it.

I've lived in Florida all of my life and I've been to all the area theme parks-- Disney, Universal, Busch Gardens, Sea World, you name it. At none of the other parks have I ever experienced anything that I would call magical. They were simply a day at _______ theme park. But Disney has always been something magical and unique. And I hope that they maintain that magic for many years to come.

SPCcom
Member
Posts: 61
(10/9/05 10:28 pm)
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New Post Re: More Magic hi people-
followed and read all your threads.
You guys are right in a lot of aspects to tell "what is the magic"
but all the while you know what it is and haven't said it.
It simply is just that!
"Where does Disney's magic come from?"
That's it. No one knows!
Its the simple end result of one person's ability to pull off his imagination's beliefs, ideas etc.. In those days he had the drive to do it and a brother to talk people out of their dollar. The magic is that the company has never lost sight of his "ideas".
Why do we get that warm and fuzzy feeling sometimes?
Because no one else has ever delivered there imagination to the extent that Walt has.

Best to you all.
naw

TheWithin
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Posts: 10
(10/11/05 2:45 pm)
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New Post Magic Thanks to everyone who wrote in. I have spent my time comparing my magic mements to everyone elses experiences and the difrences and similarities are amazing.

I am intrested in the type of magic that Disney creates, the publisize that they have magic and you will experience it when you come here. They are the only company I know of that does this. What I gather from this is that they have a formular and have it partialy bottled.

If I want to sell magic to my guests or clients, how do I do it?

ewc
Member
Posts: 465
(10/11/05 5:59 pm)
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New Post Selling magic Selling magic is pretty simple in concept but hard in execution. In theory you need to provide the guest with an experience they can take to heart.

All of this above post on magic was about having some type of connection, with a loved one, a walk around character or an attraction or being swept up my a performance. These connections could not have been made if the details were not there or if it was not a place you wanted to be.

Take theater for example. No matter how good the actors are, if the story they are acting out is bad, there wonít be any magic. If people watching the play are scared about something happening to them (someone starting a fight with them, the roof collapsing, the place catching of fire) magic wonít happen. If people canít get comfortable in the theater because the seats are uncomfortable, or their feet are stuck to the floor because of gum, or the theater smells like garbage, magic will not happen. If the lighting is bad making it hard to see the set or evokes mismatched feelings, magic will not happen.

People have a set of needs that must be met before magic can happen. However, these needs arenít sufficient by themselves to create magic. Once peopleís basic needs are meet, you have to create opportunities where emotional connections can be made. Itís these connections people interpret as magic.

-Eric

Holly3216
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Posts: 20
(10/13/05 10:04 am)
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New Post Re: Selling magic That's true...we were just talking in class last night about ergonomics... A movie theater or theater in general has had hundreds of years of development in which they've figured out how to pacify an audience so that they can focus soley on the sudio/visual realm that is being presented to them (even the high-fat food at the snackbar has a pacifying influence). However, active experiences like themeparks, interactive experiences like DisneyQuest, etc. haven't had as much time to develop. I wonder what the "ergonomics" of these experiences are...? What are the essential needs that are required for magic to happen?

Story is about taking the audience to an emotional place (the "emotional connection")... at least that's what all of my professors are telling us every day! =) If you don't take them somewhere, it's just a sequence of events... ("This happened...and then this happened...and then this happened...and then..."). Once you know where you want to take the audience emotionally, your design of the environment, ride vehicles/track, etc. should be able to flow out of that concept. At least that's the theory of it...what the designers are teaching @ UCF...!

Thanks for the insight Eric...Just when we think we've discussed almost everything, there is more!

Edited by: Holly3216 at: 10/13/05 10:07 am
TheWithin
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Posts: 12
(10/17/05 6:12 pm)
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New Post Re: Selling magic I am excited about the idea of developing the emotional aspect of the show or ride. Asking the question "how should the audience feel" is exciting. Working on and developing the emotional feel of the show as a part of the project would have great implications. Most of the time we leave this up to chance, as in hopping this hapens when telling the story. If we actualy said, why didn't it happen, might be a step in the right direction.

Meloncov
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Posts: 65
(11/1/05 9:21 pm)
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New Post Disney Magic I believe that Disney magic is largely suspension of disbelief. Not only in temporairly believing the fantasy around you, but also suspending your doubts about the world.

giant4203
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Posts: 1
(11/15/05 2:38 am)
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New Post Re: Disney Magic Magic is many things. Being a Cast Member at disney, it is my job to make magic for thousands of guests every day. Like I said, not one thing alone can create magic. It takes an incredible attention to detail to fully immerce the guest in the story that you are trying to tell. It also takes a talented cast of employees to reinforce that you are in the story. Just because a ride is built and looks amazing, doesn't mean that you're automatically going to have magic. It takes people constantly creating the magic, and guests constantly believing in that magic to sustain it.

Matt Stevens
WDW College Program Spring 2005
Rock n Rollercoaster Operations
AIM- giant4203
TheWithin
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Posts: 21
(11/15/05 3:21 pm)
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New Post Re: Disney Magic I recently had a chance to see the Haloween decorations in Disneland Paris, they were incredible. I was floored to see decorations created behind a story line. This was to me a good example of bringing magic to guests and gave me more to think about what magic is. I was doubtful that seasonal decoration would add to the magical experience, and I now see that I can be wrong.

Meloncov
Member
Posts: 89
(11/15/05 7:29 pm)
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New Post Re: Disney Magic TheWithin, have you seen any sites with pictures?

TheWithin
Member
Posts: 24
(11/16/05 1:52 pm)
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New Post Re: Disney Magic
I found the photos on a back log at miceage I believe. Realy good photos. Great stuff.
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