Themed Attraction.com Forum Index Themed Attraction.com
Welcome to the official message boards for themedattraction.com.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

 

Google
 
AutoCAD

 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Themed Attraction.com Forum Index -> Imagination Forum - Theme Park Attraction Design & Imagineering
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
DancinBelle



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 165
Location: Virginia

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 5:34 pm    Post subject: AutoCAD Reply with quote

My technical drawing class has just started learning AutoCAD. It's a lot harder than I thought!! I seem to have issues with the simplest things (not limited to the computer getting unplugged Very Happy ). Are there any tricks for easy use?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
admin
Site Admin


Joined: 28 Jul 2007
Posts: 381

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My advice is to pay attention to line weights. If you can master those, your drawings will stand out.

Details get the lightest line weights. Things like desks or window panes, or what not.

Any object that is next to a change in plane gets a heavier line weight: Think of the way a step looks from the front. A step gets a medium line weight. Also, regular walls get a medium line weight.

The heaviest line weights are reserved for wall edges, any section cut or a ground line.

Most technical Cad classes completely miss the art of correct line weights. Master their use and you'll do well.

Nate
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
feralchicken



Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Posts: 13
Location: England

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Keep an eye on what the text prompt is asking for at the bottom of the screen, as this can often help you learn how to use the various commands.
And just keep playing around with it and practising - don't be afraid to use the different buttons (just make sure you keep saving regularly!).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rcj3



Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Posts: 41
Location: Maryland(for now)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are both good tips. I am still working on the line weights. Every company I have worked for has had me use the program differently. Paying attention to the command line in the beginning is good as it tells you all your choices for the command being used. When you get into plotting make sure to review your settings. Make sure it is set to plot the lineweights and not by the color assigned weights.

Most of all pay attention to the instructor and just play with it. Draw lines, circles, arcs. Go wild and just play with the commands you can always erase and undo things. Another thing I have always done and it helps is to search for the acad.pgp file and print it out. Just open it in notepad. This file lists all the keyboard letter and letter combinations to start commands. It can be a good reference in the beginning. I like the buttons but to many buttons get in the way. Use them in the beginning and as you get more comfortable with the program you will probably end up using the keyboard to invoke the basic commands.

Don't let the program scare you, save the screams for the Haunted House rides.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rcj3



Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Posts: 41
Location: Maryland(for now)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So how is the AutoCAD coming?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DancinBelle



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 165
Location: Virginia

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2007 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great! I can do all kinds of cool stuff. Near the end of the year we'll start using Inventor, and I hear that once you use that, you never want to go back! Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Holly
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 229
Location: Orlando, FL

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally, I would learn SketchUp if possible... It appears to be becoming an industry standard right now... I have never heard of Inventor... What does it do?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rcj3



Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Posts: 41
Location: Maryland(for now)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2007 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool! Tell me what you think about Inventor when you get to it. I would love to learn how to use that.

Inventor is Autodesk's version of programs like Solidworks or Pro-E. It is a parametric model software that companies use when design parts and making assemblies of those parts. The company I work for uses it for design the inductions and chutes for our high speed sorters. They are definitely cool programs and users are in demand in the mechanical design arena.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
admin
Site Admin


Joined: 28 Jul 2007
Posts: 381

PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2007 1:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If that's what it's used for: I'd skip Inventor altogether. The problem with a lot of cad classes is that they teach you how to draft like a mechanical engineer, which is completely opposite of how an architect will draft. Even further still is a themed entertainment designer where sometimes there are no straight lines and everything has to do with drawing style. It begins to cross into art which is far removed from drawing a machined part. Proceed with caution.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
rcj3



Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Posts: 41
Location: Maryland(for now)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it can be used for doing some architecture stuff but is more suited for the mechanical. My background goes both ways which can be a pain. I do mechanical for work then switch back to architecture for home biz stuff. I get design whiplash sometimes. It is hard to let go of the somewhat rigidness of mechanical for the more free form style in architecture.

I have checked out a program that looks pretty cool. Maybe someone here has used it. It is called Vectorworks (http://www.nemetschek.net/). Looks to have some neat design features for lighting and stage design. Has anyone ever used or tried it?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DancinBelle



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 165
Location: Virginia

PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One really cool thing Inventor can do: You create a 3-D form, and it can give you the multi-view automatically! You can also change what material your figure is made out of. When it's something reflective, you can see the parking lot of their building in the shape if you move it around. Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Holly
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 229
Location: Orlando, FL

PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2007 8:39 pm    Post subject: vector Reply with quote

I used Vectorworks in my theatre classes, but I haven't used it out in industry yet... not to say it might not be used out in industry... i just haven't run into anyone else familiar with it yet.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rcj3



Joined: 31 Jul 2007
Posts: 41
Location: Maryland(for now)

PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What did you think of it Holly? Was it a hard program to use?

Another cool thing out there is on the Autodesk website you can download a personal version of MAYA software. I think they say the only limitation is that it has a a watermark on the images so that you cannot use it for commercial purposes. I was thinking of seeing my computer can handle running it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Holly
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 229
Location: Orlando, FL

PostPosted: Tue Dec 11, 2007 8:29 pm    Post subject: VectorWorks Reply with quote

I didn't find it too hard to learn... but then, I learned Maya first! Wink

Once you learn one 3D program, it's not as hard to pick up the other ones... I've used Maya, 3DS Max, Lightwave, VectorWorks, Blender and POV Ray. Now everyone is saying I should learn SketchUp... Gaaaahhh! You can't win, lol...

VectorWorks is not too bad for entry level, if you don't get too weighed down with all of the extra tools for lighting, architecture, etc. If you find a good tutorial and just concentrate on the basic modelling set of tools first, it should start to make sense pretty quickly
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Loric



Joined: 03 Jan 2008
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 5:08 am    Post subject: Re: VectorWorks Reply with quote

[quote="Holly"]I didn't find it too hard to learn... but then, I learned Maya first! Wink

Once you learn one 3D program, it's not as hard to pick up the other ones... I've used Maya, 3DS Max, Lightwave, VectorWorks, Blender and POV Ray. Now everyone is saying I should learn SketchUp... Gaaaahhh! You can't win, lol...

VectorWorks is not too bad for entry level, if you don't get too weighed down with all of the extra tools for lighting, architecture, etc. If you find a good tutorial and just concentrate on the basic modelling set of tools first, it should start to make sense pretty quickly[/quote]

I heard Vectorworks was a pain in the tushy. Having to define the paper size and everything from the start - kinda like real hand drafting, versus AutoCAD's ability to define the scale and print size AFTER you're finished. Autocad is more like a sandbox that way.

Something this discussion brought up for me - my experience has been that working with designers who use AutoCAD to "sandbox" and design from the start, they tend to ignore color, texture, fabrics, etc in their process and when it gets to the shop I spend a lot of wasted time coming up with solutions to problems. Same for the lighting - when the system doesn't render an exact gel color or it looks different on real costumes or the set - it's a bit of wasted time and money on gels and such.

I almost feel like i can see an autoCAD based design versus one that came from a hand drawn or worked medium which was later transfered to a working file in autoCAD. The sets with too many straight lines, repeated parts, and some of those unfleshed out details i mentioned earlier.

In terms of some stuff everyone might recognize - anyone remember the concept art for Monsters Inc Laugh Floor? It looked very nice and was computer generated and quite possibly a POV rendered from a CAD program - but when the actual attraction was built.. whoo..

I'm sorry, but lots of blank walls with nothing on them, big empty spaces, and lots of dead areas. Very cold enviroment.

So part of that problem was forgetting that the finished product, the show, is the artform not the rendering, and also that other design tools exist for a reason - like modeling and elevations.

I know folks tend to skip elevations if they're doing work in CAD and particularly 3D modeling of a scenic design. Skipping the elevations means big ole blank dead spaces you didn't know existed until you end up in the shop with them staring you in the face. So, there's a reason for some of the older "obsolete" processes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Holly
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 229
Location: Orlando, FL

PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2008 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That can be a problem... Sometimes it is easy to make something look great on a computer, or even in a hand-drawn sketch... but it won't look that way when built. Even a hand-drawn sketch can be notoriously deceiving... A drawing can be very enticing, but there may be no way in reality to build it or light it the way it is drawn... If the sketch is small, you may not realize how big the flat areas are because they seem to "work" with the rest of the decor (when in reality, from eye-level, those areas will be overwhelming). You can cheat the perspective too... or draw from an angle the guest will never see it from... You have to make sure to talk it through, try to see it in your mind and work things out so that what you are "selling" is not just a pretty picture, but something that is financially and physically possible... It is also extremely nice to have someone who has been in the field and knows intimately how guests see things, and where they spend their time... so that you don't throw all your cash into something that they won't look at or notice (or which will look bad in a year from wear and tear because of where you placed it)... There is definitely more to design that just making it look good on paper...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
admin
Site Admin


Joined: 28 Jul 2007
Posts: 381

PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 2:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adding onto what Holly said, it's really easy to design something that looks great in 2-d, but you notice some huge flaws once it is built. I've made a habit of always building my designs in sketchup recently and it's made a big difference when its built. I've caught quite a few mistakes, and that saves a lot of heartache. It's amazing what a model, computer or otherwise can help you decide in terms of design decisions.

Nate
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
DancinBelle



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 165
Location: Virginia

PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All right, sorry to revive such an old topic, but I took the AutoCAD certification test today and passed!!! Very Happy It's good for three years, which will be handy for my 2 year mechanical engineering design program. Yay!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Silito



Joined: 13 Apr 2008
Posts: 24
Location: Dixie! (tha South)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mech Effects Cool

""Ladies and Gentlemen.........I give yyoouu.........KOOOONG!!!!!"" Surprised
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Holly
Site Admin


Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 229
Location: Orlando, FL

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, congratulations! Very Happy
I hope you have fun in your mechanical engineering program Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
icandrawem2



Joined: 16 Aug 2007
Posts: 171

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thats great! im still using autocad 2000 so id probably have to learn alot of new stuff to get certified!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DancinBelle



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 165
Location: Virginia

PostPosted: Sat May 10, 2008 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, the certification was for AutoCAD 2000, even though we use 2008 at school, which made it kinda hard to test stuff, but I did it!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Themed Attraction.com Forum Index -> Imagination Forum - Theme Park Attraction Design & Imagineering All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group